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Coprinus disseminatus.   Click a photo to enlarge it.   back to list

synonyms: Coprin dissemine, Fairy Inkcap, GesäterTintling, Sereges tintagomba
Coprinus disseminatus 3 Mushroom
Ref No: 7570
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Coprinus disseminatus Mushroom
Ref No: 7571
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Coprinus disseminatus2 Mushroom
Ref No: 7573
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location: North America, Europe
edibility: Inedible
fungus colour: White to cream, Brown
normal size: Less than 5cm
cap type: Conical or nearly so
flesh: Flesh granular or brittle
spore colour: Purplish to black
habitat: Grows on the ground, Grows on wood

Coprinus disseminatus (Pers. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray syn. Psathyrella disseminala (Pers. ex Fr.) Quél. Fairies' Bonnets, Trooping Crumble Cap, Coprin dissemine, Gesäter Tintling, Zwerminktzwam, Sereges tintagomba. Cap 0.5-1.5cm high, ovoid at first, expanding to convex or bell-shaped; pale buff with buff or honey-buff center; deeply grooved, minutely scruffy. Gills attached, nearly distant, broad; white then amber to black, but not inky or deliquescing. Stem 15-40 x 1-3mm, hollow, fragile; white with a buff tinge near the base, which is covered in white down; smooth to minutely hairy. Flesh fragile. Odor none. Spores ellipsoid to almond-shaped, smooth, 7-9.5 x 4-5µ. Deposit dark brown or blackish. Dermatocystidia thin-walled, blunt, cylindrical, with a swollen base, 75-100 x 20-30µ. Habitat in large groups (sometimes hundreds) on stumps and debris of deciduous wood and on lawns and grassy areas. Found widely distributed in eastern North America and California and Europe. Season May-October (November-March in southern California). Edible but not worthwhile.

Members' images and comments

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Lorand Bartho (Hungary) - 24 June 2016

C. disseminatus probably contains coprin, a substance characteristic for C. atramentarius. Luckily enough, hardly anybody eats C. disseminatus because of the small size.
Coprinus disseminatus2
Nikolai Kashpor (Russian Federation) - 21 March 2016

Coprinellus disseminatus, according IF. Kaluga region, RF. Nikolai Kashpor, mushroom lover
Coprinus disseminatus2
Kat Evans (United States) - 20 June 2013

Found in Virginia, USA
Coprinus disseminatus2
Ramachandran Pappadi (India) - 30 November 2011

I am interested in fungi as a photographer.My interests lie somewhere else, but includes flora other than fungi. Nothing against it,though. I took this photo yesterday 29th November,2011 at Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala,India. They were on a coconut tree stump in the dark corner of a piece of land with heavily grown plants. I am no taxonomist, but I found through a net search it is C.disseminatus. I was referred to this site by John through http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/forums/thread14665.htm . Thank you.
Coprinus disseminatus2
Jo Priestnall (United Kingdom) - 27 June 2011

Sep 10, Welwyn Garden City, Herts
Coprinus disseminatus2
Mirosław Wantoch-Rekowski (Poland) - 30 October 2010

Gdansk Oliwa.Poland
Coprinus disseminatus2
Slobodan Nikolic (Yugoslavia) - 03 May 2010

Coprinus disseminatus2
Lorand Bartho (Hungary) - 19 November 2008

C. disseminatus probably contains coprin, a substance characteristic for C. atramentarius. Luckily enough, hardly anybody eats C. disseminatus because of the small size.
Coprinus disseminatus2
Lorand Bartho (Hungary) - 19 November 2008

In the foreground, Xylaria polymorpha.
Coprinus disseminatus2
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